Special Notice: Due to technology issues, SMUD is temporarily unable to accept payments at any of the remote pay stations such as grocery or Wal-Mart stores. In-person payments can be made only at the SMUD Customer Service Center located at 6301 S Street, Sacramento.

If you made a payment at a remote pay station between Saturday, April 22 and Thursday, April 27 there may be a delay in the payment being credited to your SMUD account. Affected customers will not be assessed late penalties and no accounts will be disconnected as a result of the issue. Payments through the mail, our website or by calling SMUD are not affected. Please accept our apologies as we work around the clock to correct the issue.

solano wind farm

Wind

The Delta breezes of Solano County are producing electricity for thousands of SMUD customers. Located in the Montezuma Hills near Rio Vista, SMUD’s wind farm was developed in 1994. A second phase was added in 2006 bringing the generating capacity to 102 megawatts (MW).

Major expansion on the way

That capacity will more than double when the next phase is built in 2012. SMUD is planning up to 75 more turbines, adding 128 MW of renewable and emission-free generation. When in place, the expansion alone will provide about 13 percent of SMUD’s renewable energy goal for 2013.

And it’s cost-effective. By relying on the wind, the “fuel costs” are zero, producing wind power at less than 5 cents per kilowatt-hour. That makes wind power one of SMUD most economical resources.

SMUD studies the wind patterns and picks the best spots for the turbines to take full advantage of the winds that whip in from the coast, squeeze through the Carquinez Straits, and spill into the Delta. The site is one of the best locations in all of California for wind generation.

Taller and more powerful, yet slower and safer

As wind energy technology develops, the turbines have grown taller, more powerful and more reliable. The second phase turbines, at 415 feet tall, were the tallest in the U.S. at the time, and towered over the original models that stood only 241 feet high. Likewise, these models had a capacity of 3 MW each or enough to meet the annual electrical needs of a thousand SMUD households. Improvements in the technology allowed SMUD to replace the original turbines. Watch a video.

As the turbines became taller, the blades grew longer. They also move more slowly than the old turbines, making it easier for birds to see the blades and avoid flying into them. The new turbines also have pedestal towers, which means birds are not able to perch or roost near the blades.

Leading the way

Powering a cleaner environment with renewable energy.

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jumping girl

Climate challenge

Together we can shape our future.

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